Social Media During Tragedy: Helpful or Harmful?

I write this post with a heavy heart, mourning the unfathomable loss of life in Paris last night. Once I received the first AP alert on my phone, I turned to Twitter to try and understand what horrific events were unfolding in the City of Light. Social media can be helpful and harmful during senseless tragedies like these, and yesterday was no different.

Facebook Safety Check

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Image via Facebook

Safety Checka Facebook notification feature launched in 2014 for disasters and crises, was activated last night for Parisians to mark their safety during the terror attacks. I received a notification after my friend in Paris checked in, much to my relief.

#PorteOuverte

Twitter users in Paris started the hashtag #PorteOuverte, which translates to Open Door, to welcome anyone into their homes for shelter. The trending hashtag was a testament to the many helpers of the world.

Image via Instagram

Scheduled Posts

Social media tools like Hootsuite and TweetDeck are helpful for marketers to easily schedule posts to send out automatically, but these services can get brands in trouble during times of crisis. Businesses with scheduled promotional tweets could appear insensitive and receive backlash from followers, so it’s important to closely monitor the online conversation.

Social media can be an outlet for messages of hope, solidarity, and compassion to be disseminated worldwide. It can also be home to widespread exploitation and misinformation. During this time of profound sadness, my thoughts are with those affected by the attacks.

Paris, je t’aime.

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Social Media Campaign: COVERGIRL x Star Wars Collection

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Image via COVERGIRL

The release of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” is two months away and super fans are really excited– just last night, several ticketing websites crashed around the world due to the high demand of pre-order tickets.

Brands are capitalizing on the upcoming release to much success, including the cosmetics brand COVERGIRL. The limited edition makeup collection features Star Wars-themed lipstick, nail polish, and mascara with names like “May the force be with you” and “You’re my only hope.”

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Image via COVERGIRL

COVERGIRL created a Tumblr for the campaign including how-to videos, digital downloads, quizzes, and more. Each of the collection’s six looks are inspired by Star Wars characters from the dark side or the light side, and Tumblr perfectly displays the high-quality photos.

COVERGIRL also shared images and videos of the collection on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #BeautyForce as well as the film’s official hashtags #StarWars and #TheForceAwakens. The brand took to Facebook to communicate with frustrated fans after the collection quickly sold out last month.

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Image via Facebook

As an added bonus, COVERGIRL teamed up with its Resistance Pilot Janelle Monae to promote the stellar collection. #Flawless.

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Images via Vanity Fair

COVERGIRL’s social media campaign successfully created buzz about the limited edition Star Wars collection and continues to encourage consumers to share their photos online with the campaign hashtag. Still trying to snag some Jedi lipstick? May the force be with you.

MailChimp Partners With Top Brands to Offer Holiday Marketing Tips

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Image via MailChimp

It’s early October, but proactive brands have been planning winter holiday marketing strategies for months. I was reminded of this upon opening a visually stunning email from MailChimp, an Atlanta-based email marketing service that created an automated email series of best practices.

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Image via MailChimp

MailChimp teamed up with Facebook, Google, Twitter, Shopify and WooCommerce to create the campaign, which also includes an interactive website filled with helpful tips and images that link to related articles from the company website.

Like a true millennial, the visual elements of the email captured my attention and the quality content led me to sign up for updates. Marketers should take note– Reuters recently reported on a forecast indicating the fierce competition for consumer dollars during the upcoming holiday season.

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Image via MailChimp
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Image via MailChimp

By sending creative emails with strong graphic design aspects and genuinely helpful insights, MailChimp was able to successfully leverage its brand as well as those of its five partners. Click here to sign up for the holiday email series.

3 Key Findings From Eventbrite’s Music Festival Study

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Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival 2014

Crowds. Four talented bands scheduled to play at the same time. Memories (and Instagram posts) to last a lifetime. Love them or hate them, festivals are increasingly impacting the way millennials (ages 17-34) experience live music today.

A recent study from Eventbrite and the social media analytics company Mashwork measured online fan conversations and demographics during the 2013-2014 music festival season. Let’s break it down.

Festivals are kind of a big deal

One in ten Americans attended a festival during the twelve month period of the study, which generated more than 20 million online music festival conversations. Millennials represented the highest portion of the conversation–nearly 75% of people ages 17-34 posted about music festivals on Twitter.

Phoenix performs at Music Midtown 2013. Count those iPhones.
Phoenix performs at Music Midtown 2013. Count those iPhones.

#Hashtag game strong

Over half of online conversations (54%) occurred before the actual festival took place, but only 19% included the official branded hashtags. From an analytics perspective, Eventbrite data highlights the importance of branded hashtags for social media coordinators to monitor the pre-event conversation.

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Local Big Ears Festival uses the official hashtag #BigEarsKnox. (photo via Twitter)

Know thy brand

Two of the most buzz-worthy elements of a music festival online are the lineup and overall experience. The study shows that festival promoters must understand their festival’s brand to build excitement before, during, and after the event.

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via Eventbrite

Read more about Eventbrite’s Industry Insights here.