Netflix and the Binge Watching Revolution

Image via Esquire

Netflix revolutionized the way television is viewed when the internet network launched its streaming service in 2007. Since then, binge watching has become a common practice among its 69 million streaming members (as of its October 24 letter to shareholders, which you can read here). (I’m a huge nerd.)

Not only has Netflix impacted our viewing habits, but it has also changed our vocabulary. Collins English Dictionary named ‘binge-watch’ as its Word of the Year.

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Image via Netflix

Netflix can even pinpoint which episode of a certain television show leads viewers to continue watching the entirety of the season. “Breaking Bad” viewers start binge watching after episode two, while “Mad Men” viewers get hooked after episode 6. For the full list, view the Variety special report.

If all this talk about binge watching is inspiring you to view every single “House of Cards” episode in one sitting, have no fear: Nielsen crunched the numbers for you. It will take exactly 1 day, 11 hours, and 45 minutes. Good luck!

Image via Nielsen Tumblr
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The Results Are In: Music Is Important

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The global research firm Nielsen released its fourth annual Music 360 2015 report this week, which measured how U.S. consumers interact with music. Highlights include the latest statistics on music consumption, discovery, and streaming.

Breaking news: everyone listens to music

According to the study, a whopping 91% of Americans listen to music and devote an average of 24 hours per week to their jam sessions. Nielsen points out the continued shift toward digital listening–75% listen to music online in a typical week. A growing number of Americans (44%) are also turning to smartphones to get their weekly music fix, up 7% since this time last year.

Video didn’t kill the radio star

The number one source of music discovery in America is radio, with 61% of respondents reporting to find new music via AM/FM or satellite radio. Family and friends (45%) as well as movies and movie soundtracks (31%) were the next top outlets for music discovery.

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Four excellent movie soundtracks (Images via Wikipedia)

Apple Music and Spotify and Tidal, oh my

Music streaming services like Spotify are increasingly gaining subscribers worldwide. Nielsen’s study breaks down the top three reasons Americans cited for choosing a particular streaming service:

  1. Cost (83%)
  2. Ease of use (82%)
  3. Song library (73%)

Price is clearly a huge issue for people who argue that music can be streamed online for free. According to the study, a mere 9% of people not currently subscribed to a streaming service reported they were likely to subscribe in the next six months.

I’m curious: do you have a favorite streaming service? Were you surprised by any of these findings? Comment below!